DAY 21: September 14 (Burgos to Hornillos del Camino 24km)

Mutti has a nightly battle with her Spanish pillow... it just doesn't fit and so far the pillow is winning!
Mutti has a nightly battle with her Spanish pillow… it just doesn’t fit and so far the pillow is winning!
The Meseta is a semi arid land. Wter is scarce. Here farmers have reshaped the slopes of the grassland so as to capture every drop of water. Huge cuts in sidehills show up everywhere
The Meseta is a semi arid land. Water is scarce. Here farmers have reshaped the slopes of the grassland so as to capture every drop of water. Huge cuts in sidehills show up everywhere
first (ever) wooden fence that we have seen in Spain, especially unusual here on the Meseta where trees simply do not exist. This was made from shipping pallets!
first (ever) wooden fence that we have seen in Spain, especially unusual here on the Meseta where trees simply do not exist. This was made from shipping pallets!
This gives you an idea of how parched the land is. Looks a lot like southern Alberta. Note how (lime) white the soil is. And note too, in the distance the green field - shows what water can do!
This gives you an idea of how parched the land is. Looks a lot like southern Alberta. Note how (lime) white the soil is. And note too, in the distance the green field – shows what water can do!
A side view of the Cathedral in Burgos as we were leaving this morning.
A side view of the Cathedral in Burgos as we were leaving this morning. Massive, beautiful and many similarities to Notre Dame
Picture of the foot of a pilgrim from the Middle Ages. Note the sandal ... from our experience it has most on today's market beat!
Picture of the foot of a pilgrim from the Middle Ages. Note the sandal … from our experience it has most on today’s market beat! We also note that this pilgrim did not have any blisters!
And to all our engineer friends out here: the following is an engineering commercial:  The Camino de Santiago was built by an engineer, named Domingo de la Calzada highly revered for having built bridges, hospitals and hotels along the Camino. He was born in 1019  - 995 years ago
And to all our engineer friends out here: the following is an engineering commercial: The Camino de Santiago was built by an engineer, named Domingo de la Calzada highly revered for having built bridges, hospitals and hotels along the Camino. He was born in 1019 – 995 years ago

DAY 21: September 14 (Burgos to Hornillos del Camino 24km)

This is an exciting day as we take our first steps into the great agricultural plain of Spain—the Meseta! The guide books describe this as a “hard country where wind, cold and rain can be miserable for the pilgrim”…..hmmm
As we begin the skies are cloudy but Dad is sure they are not storm clouds. We do have a strong head wind (15 mph gusting to 25) so we tie our hats on.
The trail is mostly very rocky with spots of loose gravel which means each step has to be a careful one.
The landscape is gentle hills growing more sunflowers, what looks like a flax crop and fallow fields. Most of the soil is like chalk and it is evident that water is a problem here. It is not a difficult walk but it does seem to go on and on. Even the villages have disappeared now. Despite the head wind we know we are making good time. We suspect the posted distances cannot be correct. Later, talking with others who travelled the same route, there is agreement that the distance was 3km more than stated. That means we walked 27km today—too far for us. Fortunately it was following a rest day:-)
Our room tonight is in a “hybrid” –not a rural casa and not an albergue. It is very small but just fine. The owner was not here when we arrived so we waited almost 2 hrs before we discovered he had left the key at the store across the street!
Hornillos is a small town and there is only one bar/restaurant.
We finally got seated with two Irishmen, both our age. They were fun and charming dinner companions. All in all it was a great day.
NOTE; Apparently the vastness and the emptiness of the Meseta can have an effect on people causing them to hallucinate and believe they are Jesus or one of the disciples. Apparently, the same thing occurs with pilgrimages to the Holy Land and is known as “Jerusalem Fever”. Anyhow, so far neither of us has succumbed–at least we seem normal to each other:-) We will keep you posted.

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